2020 Subaru Legacy First Impressions; Should You Buy a Vehicle with No Maintenance History? | #218

This week we discuss the 2020 Subaru Legacy, and share our first impressions on the all-wheel drive sedan. We also discuss the controversy surrounding changing emissions and fuel economy standards. And we answer audience questions about the risk of buying a car without a maintenance history, a replacement for a beloved Ford Flex, if driving habits should change when switching from all-wheel drive gas vehicle to a rear wheel drive electric car, and if driving a manual during a long commute is a good idea.

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SHOW NOTES
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00:29 – Changing Emissions and Fuel Economy Standards Controversy

07:40 – 2020 Subaru Legacy

12:29 – Question #1: Should driving habits change when switching from all-wheel drive gas vehicle to a rear wheel drive electric car?

14:02 – Question #2: What are the risks of buying a car without a maintenance history?

16:19 – Question #3: What is a worthy replacement for a 2013 Ford Flex?

18:48 – Question #4: Should factory incentives sway ones car buying decision?

21:01 – Question #5: Is driving a manual during a long commute a good idea?

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4 Automakers Compromise With California on Fuel Emissions

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2011 BMW X3 first look

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4K Review: 2018 Jaguar XE Quick Drive

2014 Ford Transit Connect Review

2019 Ford Edge Quick Drive

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2019 Detroit Auto Show: 2020 Kia Telluride

2018 LA Auto Show: 2020 Hyundai Palisade

2019 Subaru Ascent Quick Drive

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20 Comments on "2020 Subaru Legacy First Impressions; Should You Buy a Vehicle with No Maintenance History? | #218"

  1. This shouldn’t even be a debate and time was wasted talking about something one man said that makes no sense.

  2. They do not sell them in Canada in reality.

  3. Don’t forget: Henry Ford was a Nazi sympathiser. I’m not sure if he is a true role model for anything.

  4. The first 7:40 was fantastic. You guys stuck with facts and science and it was a very correct and appropriate correction of some uneducated assumptions by the president.

  5. Guy totals his Mitsubishi Outlander and wants a 13 year old BMW X3 with no service history?
    Sounds like he’s a glutton for punishment.

  6. #3- Wait for the Bronco

  7. Kevin Elsworth | August 29, 2019 at 7:58 pm | Reply

    I had a 08 Legacy and it drove like a sports sedan. Stiff suspension, responsive steering, great precision. I’m a little disappointed the new Legacy didn’t offer a return to those driving dynamics with the turbo. I’d especially like a rear-wheel biased AWD system outside the WRX.

    Anyway… Yeah, January 20, 2021 — can’t come soon enough if you ask me.

  8. George Repper | August 29, 2019 at 8:04 pm | Reply

    which Jaguar was discontinued specifically?

  9. Good show team… 😎👍

  10. Louis Carliner | August 29, 2019 at 8:19 pm | Reply

    Premium fuel is typically costs some $0.60 more than regular gas. In terms of cost of ownership, is not equivalent to that of regular gas for the equivalent MPG ratings. It would be interesting to know what the equivalent environmental impact that the extra refining of premium fuel has.

  11. Michael Lopour | August 29, 2019 at 8:21 pm | Reply

    There are 60 brand new Ford Flex’s on dealer lots within 50 miles of me. Unless you are picky about options get another Flex… or maybe you didn’t really love it all that much?!?

  12. Looks like they got Volvo or Volvo interior OEM to work on the infotainment.

  13. hockeyandsoccer4ever | August 29, 2019 at 9:31 pm | Reply

    14:15
    This guy really used a snapchat filter for asking CR a question Lmfao😂😂😂

  14. Fried Chicken Now | August 29, 2019 at 11:15 pm | Reply

    10% ethanol in our gasoline is CRAZY.

  15. Didimo Bautista | August 29, 2019 at 11:20 pm | Reply

    Now Consumer Reports is going to be called …The Media

  16. You don’t purchase a car by the pound.

  17. Subaru lost me on the Legacy since 2007. The Accord and Camry look so much better and beat it all around on features for less money.

  18. first off, thanks for the insight on the incentives for dealers. I did not know that, and I’m glad I do now.

    Second, to the person who has a 100 mile commute. I can actually provide some insight myself as I did have a 100 mile round trip commute with a mix of stop and go and highway driving. the majority was with my ECHO, but I did do some with my 2009 GTI, both cars had manual transmissions. So here’s what I would say. unless you have a very physical job, the manual transmission won’t bother you. Now, if you are on your feet all day (which I was for a good chunk of my time in the ECHO), then it will suck if you get a crap triggered in heavy traffic. Not fun to say the least.

    but there are some other things that definitely come more into play with a long commute. One thing is car maintenance costs go up, a lot. So if you have a car that wears through parts quickly, or chugs gas, that is going to be something that is going to be way more annoying than the manual. you don’t realize how much oil changes suck, till you’re doing them every two months. another big factor is range. the cars I had during this commute got either 300 miles to a tank (the GTI) or 400 miles to a tank (the ECHO) having to stop for fuel every 3 days is very annoying. its a big drain on your time. especially when you’ve had a long day and just want to GET HOME. having to stop at a gas station for the second time that week, can feel really bad. because there it’s the last thing you want to do. So a car with a big range is a huge plus.

    To your point. if you have to commute 100 miles round trip, I would take their advice and stick with the GLI for awhile. because again, your commute “eats your car”, so it’s best to let it consume your current car before you get a new one. But, as far as what’s listed, I would probably get the insight. the volt is nice, but in my experience Chevy really cheaps out on their seats, and that will be a quite literal pain in the butt. way worse than driving the manual GLI, which probably has really nice seats. The jag would be great, but because cost of ownership goes way up with a long commute, and I believe Jags generally have one of the highest costs per mile, and you will be doing a LOT of miles. so that leaves the Honda.

    other pieces of advice, save your sick days for bad weather. If you cross multiple counties, some spend money on clearing roads, and some really don’t. If one of those counties is uncross-able, it’s best to turn back and take the day. also a good radio/music/pod casts are a MUST! my 100 mile commute was unbearable when the radio went out due to the electric system dying. The manual, I didn’t notice; the lack of AC, was irritating; and even the lack of a driver’s side door that closed properly, was extremely bother some; but the thing that drove me the most crazy was being stuck in traffic with no tunes.

    Hope that helps!

  19. While we are “getting more car for our dollar” now, cars have become ridiculously expensive. Average working Americans have a real issues affording them now.

  20. People can’t afford new cars because they get paid less thing else went up in price

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