2022 Toyota Tundra | Talking Cars #350

2022 Toyota Tundra | Talking Cars #350 1

The 2022 Tundra marks the first thorough redesign of Toyota’s full-sized pickup in 15 years. We rented the 1794 Edition, and share our first impressions of its handling around our test track. We also discuss the slick powertrain, upgraded cabin, multilink rear suspension with coil springs, and how it stacks up against competitors like the RAM 1500, Ford F-150, and Chevrolet Silverado. Also, with the variety of all-wheel drive systems on the market, we discuss what to consider when choosing a vehicle with AWD, and why Subaru's Symmetrical system is unique.

———————————–
Subscribe to Talking Cars on Apple Podcasts!

Video version: 

Audio version: 

Have a question for our experts? Leave a comment on this episode, or reach out to us directly!

From your iOS device, iMessage us at TalkingCars@icloud.com to send a photo, video, or text directly to the Talking Cars team!

We love to feature our viewers on the show, so submit video questions at 

Subscribe to Talking Cars on Spotify: 

SHOW NOTES
———————————–
00:00 – Introduction
00:50 – 2022 Toyota Tundra
12:36 – Question: Are all AWD systems created equal?

———————————-  
Preview: 2022 Toyota Tundra Boasts Hybrid Powertrain, Key Safety Features

2014 Toyota Tundra first drive

Do you really need all-wheel drive?

Guide to Car Safety

———————————–
Check out   for the latest reviews, tips, and recommendations and subscribe to our YouTube Channel:   

Follow Us on Social:
Facebook: 
Twitter: 
Pinterest: 
Instagram: 
Google+: 

17 Comments on "2022 Toyota Tundra | Talking Cars #350"

  1. 2:06 oh that orange peel paint…

  2. Chezzyperson 33 | March 11, 2022 at 3:21 PM | Reply

    The new Tundra is better than the old Tundra in every way except reliability

  3. Can we please stop praising truck manufacturers for going to coil-sprung rear suspensions? I realize that they ride better when unladen, but when it comes to half-ton pickup trucks, towing and hauling should take precedence over ride comfort every time. Leaf springs remain the best option for cost, reliability, ease of maintenance, and their ability to handle weight.

    Putting rear coil springs on a half-ton pickup truck is like sending a Gladiator into the arena armed with a steak knife. Sure, you can still stab someone with a steak knife, but a sword is still a much better tool for the job.

  4. The new CR-V hybrid has mechanical AWD with a physical drive shaft. Surprised that wasn’t mentioned. However, in a review on YouTube I watched, CR-V doesn’t actually have better AWD performance.

  5. Smooth Operator | March 11, 2022 at 3:41 PM | Reply

    I ordered an SR5 TRD OR…was told 4 month wait,initially I wanted the TRD Sport but changed my mind.The dealership isn’t too happy with me changing my mind every month BUT it’s my money & I’m learning more about this truck by the day because there are so many models & options which tend to differ in Canada…Compared to the US models.

  6. Kurt Firestone | March 11, 2022 at 3:43 PM | Reply

    It’s a Toyota with a Ford drivetrain

  7. Adrian Cooper | March 11, 2022 at 4:00 PM | Reply

    Hey I thought the Toyota TRD Pro was the highest model?!
    Also if you have a Class A Commercial Drivers License or if you drive an articulated vehicle you will have the skill to back up a trailer. You’ll have to steer the cab in the opposite direction.

  8. Adrian Cooper | March 11, 2022 at 4:03 PM | Reply

    He needs so stick with his Subaru. The latter model have better pick up.

  9. Hey CR, there ARE hybrid mechanical AWD systems outside of the Crosstrek.

  10. @2:20 I think 1794 is like the middle trim and there is TRD Pro & Capstone is the top of the line for 2022 Tundra. @5:00 Not to forget Tundra also has the option to turn off Engine stop/start system with a button next to auto highbeam button. @6:49 “Toyota reliability come from cautiously implementing” but I hear Turbo waste gate issue from the brand new Tundra with 300ish miles and customer had to wait for a month. That makes a Toyota lover like me less interest in turbo engines even by Toyota. When I check the new Tundra in person I was also thinking will things like front engine cooling flaps mechanism / front spoiler mechanism could fail or not. Also headlight adjustment mechanism also adds complication could contribute to expected reliability. Rear axle from Hino also looked identical to 4Runner. It is also interesting that Falken Wildpeak AT3WA from factory on Tundra are not 3PMSF tire vs aftermarket Falken Wildpeak AT3W on my 4R are 3PMSF rated tire. I’m also interested to see CR impressions on steering controls and see how much you can control the infotainment system like music. Also test the new rear locker and 4wd system on that rocky course at CR.

  11. toyota actually has always done the brake petal thing for different features. my 2010 highlander has hill hold that you activate by pushing the brake petal down harder

  12. @15:52 Do you think a true mechanical Torsen Center diff true 4×4 would for better than a almost mechanical viscous coupling center differential with traction control base awd on Subaru be better or even a electro magnetic center differential with torque vectoring rear diff based AWD system like on Honda iVTM4 / Acura sh-awd be superior than Subaru? I see few Toyota models also use torque vectoring rear diff with electro magnetic center differential without just relying on traction control based system. (True that I’m still old school using 4WD not AWD and this comment is a question not a statement).

  13. They did a lot of talking about Subaru AWD, but didn’t answer the guys question.

  14. Symmetrical awd doesn’t mean power is going to all wheels. It means the axle shift length is equal for both left and right.

  15. Russell Silverstein | March 11, 2022 at 5:02 PM | Reply

    Looking to buy new 2023 Tundra. You’re feedback is always appreciated.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*