2021 Hyundai Santa Fe; the Future of Infrastructure, Self-Driving, and EVs | Talking Cars #300

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe; The Future Of Infrastructure, Self-Driving, And Evs | Talking Cars #300 1

This week we give our first impressions of the 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe, sharing how it performed on our track, interior comfort and quality, and where it fits into Hyundai's crowded SUV family. We also share how recent testing at the Consumer Reports test track discovered issues with the 2021 Hyundai Elantra and 2021 Toyota Sienna, and how each automaker responded to our findings to fix these vehicles. And our humble podcast has been on the road for over 8 years, beginning in March 2013, so to celebrate our 300th episode, we feature predictions from the Talking Cars audience about what we'll be discussing 8 years from now, covering the future of electric vehicles, infrastructure, self-driving and autonomous cars, and more!

:59 – issues CR discovered while testing Hyundai Elantra and Toyota Sienna

7:20 – 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe First Impressions

13:43 – Episode 300 reflections; what our audience thinks we will be discussing for our next 300 episodes!

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13 Comments on "2021 Hyundai Santa Fe; the Future of Infrastructure, Self-Driving, and EVs | Talking Cars #300"

  1. Light pollution from the cars are getting worse. I want a quiet car with way less light pollution!!

  2. Cesar Trujillo | March 29, 2021 at 3:32 PM | Reply

    Will there be too many car chips once the chip shortage is over? What do they do with excess car chips? I wouldn’t think they could ever use them for anything else. Plus they are not usually made with the fastest processes so they aren’t forward compatible.

  3. What’s the light and noise pollution emitted from these cars?

  4. Great Show as always !!!!

  5. I look forward to the day where I can drive a car that doesn’t pollute the planet but the technology simply isn’t there yet. Thumbs up to the early adopters who are pushing development forward but for the vast majority of drivers out there EVs still don’t make sense. Get back to me in five years and I might feel differently but even a car that charges 100 percent in 30 minutes is an inconvenience. Manufacturers are jumping off a cliff.

  6. Michael Sprinzeles | March 29, 2021 at 4:20 PM | Reply

    Wagons were/are cars with more cargo room.
    Save the wagons;)
    Save the manuals!
    I’m saving both with my 5 spd manual Outback XT.

  7. Prashant Kompella | March 29, 2021 at 4:21 PM | Reply

    Congratulations guys!! 🤟💥

  8. Where’s tom mutchmore?

  9. Thanks all the hard work you guys do to protect consumers by forcing company be more responsible.

  10. Enjoy these videos, and kudos on finding the programming flaws on the Hyundai & Toyota test cars. It’s good to see that these manufacturers took your findings seriously, and took immediate action to implement solutions. Not all car manufacturers are so responsive to shortcomings being pointed out to them, as you well know! Now – the Santa Fe: I was a bit surprised that you didn’t mention anything about the “firm ride” that the ’21 has (and you had previously noted in your recent preliminary findings). For some reason, Hyundai (and now Kia) does not seem to have the ability to engineer and install a compliant and competent handling suspension in most of their vehicles. For example, my wife and I previously rented a ’19 Santa Fe, and really liked it… except for the firm, mini-truck suspension. That was a deal breaker. Now, we’ve been anxiously waiting for some objective, non-happy-talk reviews (and Youtube is full of them) on the the ’21 Santa Fe. If this new Santa Fe turns out to be as hard riding as before, and as hard riding as their sister vehicle Sorento as been reported to have (I won’t even get into the behavior of their new DCT transmissions in the Santa Fe & Sorento), we’ll pull the trigger on an ’21 Outback XT. It’s a shame, because we really LIKE the ’21 Santa Fe more than the ’19, but just because you drive a SUV/crossover/etc., it doesn’t mean you have to suffer with a crummy ride.

  11. 16:50 ohh Sam, that’s juicy!
    If you’re here reading this, you would be right, sorta. It was either 2001 or 2005 that all California sold vehicles will be 10% ZEV(+SULEV) if that car marker sold more 5 – 10% of the total annual market.

    Well… CARB got sued and gutted in the 2000s for its progressive regulation, and its trajectory after 2005. I think it’s in a documentary about the EV1 🤔🤔d’y’kno😅

  12. Electric vehicles are just better. No noise, no emissions, less fuel costs, less maintenance costs.
    Gasoline and diesel are OLD polluting technology. So last century.
    Electric cars, electric trucks, electric buses, electric trash haulers, electric snow blowers, electric lawn mowers, electric snow mobiles, electric water craft, electric garden tools, electric mechanic tools, electric motor cycles, electric bicycles, electric scooters, electric farm tractors, electric construction equipment, electric delivery vehicles, …… everything is going electric. No worries about starting after sitting for a few months. Gas always needs repairs.

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